Pim Otero

  • Peer Tutor

Pim is a junior in the College Arts & Sciences majoring in global health and environment with a second major in economics & strategy and a minor in healthcare management. On campus, she is a member of the student-run nonprofit GlobeMed as well as the pre-healthcare fraternity Alpha Iota Gamma. After graduation, Pim hopes to work within healthcare management in her home state, California, in an effort to engage in improving health outcomes in her area. In her free time, she enjoys listening to podcasts, eating ice cream, and exploring new restaurants.

What brought you to The Writing Center?

In high school, I was always looking for people to help streamline my ideas. I tried to brainstorm with anyone—teachers, friends, or family. Once I reached college, I realized that the process of working through any stage of writing (whether it be ideas or a full final draft) was not only extremely beneficial as a writer, but I was able to learn interesting topics from other students by helping them streamline in return. This culminated in my desire to work as a tutor in The Writing Center! Not only am I able to help others grow, but I am able to join them on their experience in improving myself as a thinker and a writer.

What do you like most about working with writers at The Writing Center?

There’s never a meeting where I don’t learn something new. The Wash U community contains some of the most interesting and dynamic students at various stages of personal and professional growth. Being able to experience their perspective has challenged me to expand my own worldview in my critical thinking and writing.

What do you find most challenging about writing?

The most challenging part of writing, in my experience, is starting. I have spent most of my writing classes trying to focus on this particular issue. Although there may be intense analysis down the road, it always seems a bit easier to tackle when there’s a fair chunk of text written (even if it’s all unusable).

What advice do you have for writers?

In the initial brainstorming stages, try “word vomiting” onto the page (basically, unstructured free-writing)! For just a few minutes, it doesn’t matter how good your ideas are, if they’re on topic, or even if they relate to one another. This has been an invaluable tool in tackling my own writer’s block.